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Cost of eye lift and forehead paralysis repair in Utah

The average cash price for eye lift and forehead paralysis repair care in Utah is $8,758 at a surgery center versus $12,286 at an outpatient hospital. While a surgery center may offer fewer complimentary services, and may not have the full range of support services that outpatient hospital provides, it may still be worth the (29%) you'd save when comparing the cost of eye lift and forehead paralysis repair performed at an outpatient hospital. Read More

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Average cash price in Utah

A common eye lift and forehead paralysis repair at surgery center facility in Utah includes

  Units Avg Cash price

Provider

Plastic & reconstructive surgeon visit provider fee

First time visit Standard
1 $128

Provider fee to repair brow paralysis

Standard Multiple Procedures/Bilateral Procedure
1 $508

Provider fee for skin procedures (incision, stretching, sutures)

Forehead Standard
1 $3,630

Provider fee to remove excess skin

Fat around eye Multiple Procedures/Bilateral Procedure
1 $549

Facility

Surgery center fee to remove excess skin

Standard Standard
1 $1,070

Surgery center fee for skin procedures (incision, stretching, sutures)

Standard Standard
1 $1,070

Surgery center fee to repair brow paralysis

Standard Standard
1 $1,093

Prescriptions

HYDROCODONE-ACETAMINOPHEN

Standard Standard
30 $17

Anesthesia

Anesthesiologist fee to be "put under" for procedure

Level 3 Standard
1 $210

Anesthesiologist time to be "put under" for procedure

Per minute Standard
231 $482
Total average cash price   $8,757.80

A common eye lift and forehead paralysis repair at outpatient hospital facility in Utah includes

  Units Avg Cash price

Provider

Plastic & reconstructive surgeon visit provider fee

First time visit Standard
1 $128

Provider fee to repair brow paralysis

Standard Multiple Procedures/Bilateral Procedure
1 $508

Provider fee for skin procedures (incision, stretching, sutures)

Forehead Standard
1 $3,630

Provider fee to remove excess skin

Fat around eye Multiple Procedures/Bilateral Procedure
1 $549

Facility

Outpatient Hospital fee to remove excess skin

level 4 Standard
1 $2,118

Outpatient Hospital fee for incision, stretching, and suture of skin

level 4 Standard
1 $2,118

Outpatient Hospital fee to repair brow paralysis

level 3 Standard
1 $2,525

Prescriptions

HYDROCODONE-ACETAMINOPHEN

Standard Standard
30 $17

Anesthesia

Anesthesiologist fee to be "put under" for procedure

Level 3 Standard
1 $210

Anesthesiologist time to be "put under" for procedure

Per minute Standard
231 $482
Total average cash price   $12,286.18

Forehead paralysis is the inability of the muscles above the eyes and below the hairline to keep the eyebrows elevated. This sometimes extends to the eyelids, making it difficult to see and altering your appearance. The medical term for this is “brow ptosis.”

Forehead paralysis is caused by damage to the nerves of the face that control these muscles. There are many conditions that can lead to forehead paralysis. Lyme disease, Bell’s palsy, surgery for skin cancer, and trauma to the forehead or eyes are the most common causes.

Nerves that are severely damaged do not heal. Because of this, repairing forehead paralysis requires altering the physical structure of the face to return your appearance to that which you had before the paralysis occurred. 

Facial paralysis often only occurs on one side of the face. This is why surgery is usually only done on the affected side. However, surgery on both sides may be required if it is impossible to restore the symmetry of the face without altering the unparalyzed side. 

Repair of forehead paralysis is done by lifting the eyebrow surgically. This surgery is done endoscopically. Endoscopy is commonly called “minimally invasive surgery;” it refers to the use of a very small incision and tools and cameras on extended sticks that allow surgeons to alter the anatomy inside the face without leaving a large scar. 

You will hear this procedure referred to by many names, such as eyelid lift, forehead lift, brow lift, browpexy, and periorbital reconstruction. In all cases, it involves reshaping the now paralyzed muscles and the tissue that surrounds them to restore your natural appearance.

Any injury to the face or medical condition that affects the nerves can cause facial paralysis. These include:

  • Lyme disease
  • Bell’s palsy
  • Facial surgery
  • Stroke
  • Trauma to the face
  • Chemotherapy medications
  • Autoimmune diseases

The exact cause of facial paralysis is generally unimportant. If the face has been paralyzed for several months and doctors do not expect a natural recovery, surgery is often recommended.

Fixing the nerve damage that leads to facial paralysis is often impossible. But this does not mean that the appearance of the face itself is set in stone. By altering the shape of the muscles, fat, and tendons within the face, your appearance can often be returned to its pre-paralyzed state.

There are a wide variety of facial palsy treatments, just as there are a wide variety of facial palsies. 

  • The most common option is watching and waiting. Many facial palsies heal in weeks to months, depending on the source. 
  • The second option is physical therapy to strengthen non paralyzed muscles near the area of the palsy. This can help with difficulty opening the eye or changes in speech due to paralysis of the mouth. 
  • Botox may be used to temporarily paralyze small areas of the non-affected side of the face. This can help to restore a symmetrical appearance to the face while the above methods are being tried. 
  • If the above methods fail, or your surgeons identify a facial palsy that is unlikely to improve without surgery, then the methods described above will be used.

Many forehead palsies that require surgery are improved following a single surgery. Minor adjustments may need to be made based on your appearance after the swelling from surgery has decreased. 

If botox and physical therapy are used before or after surgery, several months of treatments may be needed to fully restore your pre-paralysis appearance.

Regular exercise, a healthy diet rich in vitamins and minerals, avoiding tobacco and alcohol, and ensuring that other medical conditions such as diabetes are being treated are key to speeding recovery. 

Physical therapy can also speed the recovery of injured nerves and strengthen other muscles in the face that help mask the effects of forehead paralysis. 

Ultimately, some nerve injuries will never heal. This is not due to you taking poor care of your health or failing to get the proper treatments. Nerves regrow in a very limited manner, and only certain injuries have the potential for a full recovery. If this is the case, the treatments and surgeries listed above can help minimize the impact of nerve injury and forehead paralysis on your appearance.

About the eye lift and forehead paralysis repair Average Cash Prices

This procedure is most commonly performed at either a surgery center or an outpatient hospital.

Surgery centers, also known as ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs), are independent, licensed medical facilities that are governed by distinct regulatory requirements compared with a hospital. Procedures performed at an ASCs are often less expensive than when they are performed at an outpatient hospital, but they typically offer fewer complimentary services, and may not have the full-range of support services that a hospital provides.

Outpatient facilities are outpatient departments or clinics that may be within or next to a hospital, but is owned and run by the affiliated hospital. These facilities can perform surgical treatments and procedures that do not require an overnight stay. Procedures performed at an outpatient hospital are often more expensive than when they are performed in an ambulatory surgery center, but outpatient hospitals may offer more complimentary and support services for patients because they are connected to the hospital system.

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* Savings estimate based on a study of more than 1 billion claims comparing self-pay (or cash pay) prices of a frequency-weighted market basket of procedures to insurer-negotiated rates for the same. Claims were collected between July 2017 and July 2019. R.Lawrence Van Horn, Arthur Laffer, Robert L.Metcalf. 2019. The Transformative Potential for Price Transparency in Healthcare: Benefits for Consumers and Providers. Health Management Policy and Innovation, Volume 4, Issue 3.

Sidecar Health offers and administers a variety of plans including ACA compliant and excepted benefit plans. Coverage and plan options may vary or may not be available in all states.

Your actual costs may be higher or lower than these cost estimates. Check with your provider and health plan details to confirm the costs that you may be charged for a service or procedure.You are responsible for costs that are not covered and for getting any pre-authorizations or referrals required by your health plan. Neither payments nor benefits are guaranteed. Provider data, including price data, provided in part by Turquoise Health.

The site is not a substitute for medical or healthcare advice and does not serve as a recommendation for a particular provider or type of medical or healthcare.