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Cost of endoscopic gallbladder removal in South Carolina

The average cash price for endoscopic gallbladder removal care in South Carolina is $4,608 at a surgery center versus $7,863 at an outpatient hospital. While a surgery center may offer fewer complimentary services, and may not have the full range of support services that outpatient hospital provides, it may still be worth the (41%) you'd save when comparing the cost of endoscopic gallbladder removal performed at an outpatient hospital. Read More

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Average cash price in South Carolina

A common endoscopic gallbladder removal at surgery center facility in South Carolina includes

  Units Avg Cash price

Provider

General surgeon visit provider fee

First time visit Standard
1 $123

Provider fee to remove gallbladder using endoscope

Standard Standard
1 $893

Facility

Surgery center fee to remove gallbladder using endoscope

Standard Standard
1 $2,705

Imaging

Radiology fee for stomach ultrasound

Limited Standard
1 $126

Anesthesia

Anesthesiologist fee to be "put under" for procedure

Level 4 Standard
1 $265

Anesthesiologist time to be "put under" for procedure

Per minute Standard
251 $495
Total average cash price   $4,607.80

A common endoscopic gallbladder removal at outpatient hospital facility in South Carolina includes

  Units Avg Cash price

Provider

General surgeon visit provider fee

First time visit Standard
1 $123

Provider fee to remove gallbladder using endoscope

Standard Standard
1 $893

Facility

Outpatient Hospital fee to remove gallbladder using endoscope

level 1 Standard
1 $5,960

Imaging

Radiology fee for stomach ultrasound

Limited Standard
1 $126

Anesthesia

Anesthesiologist fee to be "put under" for procedure

Level 4 Standard
1 $265

Anesthesiologist time to be "put under" for procedure

Per minute Standard
251 $495
Total average cash price   $7,862.59

Endoscopic gallbladder removal, also known as laparoscopic cholecystectomy, is the surgical removal of the gallbladder through a minimally invasive process called laparoscopy. In the past, gallbladder removal required a large incision into the abdominal cavity through which the surgeon removed the gallbladder under direct visualization. Since 1989 when it was invented, the laparoscope enables the gallbladder to be removed with only a small incision in the abdomen, with the gallbladder being removed via a handheld device while the surgeon visualizes the gallbladder on a screen, using the video camera and light source on the laparoscope. The smaller incision size and less involved surgery enable faster healing time and less pain than the prior method.  

The gallbladder is a small pouch-like structure located next to the liver, on the right side of the abdominal cavity. Its function is to store bile that is produced by the liver. Bile is a substance that helps in the digestion of fatty foods. Sometimes, the bile can build up and form crystals, or gallstones. This can block the exit of the bile from the gallbladder, leading to inflammation and infection of the gallbladder, which can cause abdominal pain and bloating on the right side of the belly area. At times, fever, nausea, and jaundice (yellow-tinged skin or eyes) can develop as well.  

If you are having some of the symptoms listed above, your physician may order bloodwork and an abdominal ultrasound, which is a test that helps visualize the liver and gallbladder to check for gallstones or inflammation. Based on these results, your symptoms, and your physical exam, your physician may recommend that you have a laparoscopic cholecystectomy. For more information, see www.my.clevelandclinic.org.

Any surgical procedure carries some risk, including infection, bleeding, and damage to nearby body organs. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is a major surgery in the sense that a body organ, the gallbladder, is being removed. However, it is now considered routine surgery, with over 600,000 such surgeries being performed yearly in the United States. The complication rate is approximately 0.5%.

A laparoscopic cholecystectomy usually lasts 1 to 2 hours if everything goes smoothly. If you have scar tissue buildup from prior abdominal surgeries or other complications, it could take longer. 

During the surgery itself, you will be under general anesthesia and will not feel any pain. Upon completion of the surgery, while in the recovery room, you will receive pain medication and a prescription for narcotic pain medication to help control your pain as you heal. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen also help with the pain. You will likely experience mild to moderate abdominal pain for the first 24-48 hours after surgery. Pain at the shoulder is also common due to the irritation of the body tissues from the extra air that is inserted into the abdominal cavity during the procedure, which helps to visualize the body organs better. Patients who undergo laparoscopic gallbladder removal usually have a faster recovery time and less pain than those undergoing the regular open type of gallbladder removal, which requires a larger incision.

Side effects of having your gallbladder remove include nausea and vomiting from the anesthesia, which usually last for a very short time after the surgery. Fatigue and constipation can also occur for up to 2 weeks as you heal from the surgery. Narcotic pain medicine can cause constipation, so as your pain resolves and you wean off of the narcotics, your bowel pattern should return to normal. 

Longer-term effects of gallbladder removal include digestion problems and chronic diarrhea. Some patients have problems digesting fatty foods. Digestion of fat requires bile, which is usually stored in the gallbladder. Once your gallbladder is removed, only smaller amounts of bile are available for digestion and can make it harder for you to digest a large fatty meal.

Chronic diarrhea is common within the first week of having your gallbladder removed, and usually lessens over the next few weeks. Males under age 50 years old are more likely to develop chronic diarrhea. You should contact your doctor for guidance on how to manage this condition.

The gallbladder acts as storage for large amounts of bile, which helps you digest fats. If you have had your gallbladder removed, you have less bile available for use during digestion. The smaller amounts of bile make it harder, but not impossible, for your body to digest fatty foods. It is recommended that you eat a low-fat diet to ensure that the food will be digested properly and not give you indigestion. Smaller, more frequent meals also put less stress on your digestive system. High fiber foods help to keep your bowels regular. For more information, visit www.hopkinsmedicine.org.

About the endoscopic gallbladder removal Average Cash Prices

This procedure is most commonly performed at either a surgery center or an outpatient hospital.

Surgery centers, also known as ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs), are independent, licensed medical facilities that are governed by distinct regulatory requirements compared with a hospital. Procedures performed at an ASCs are often less expensive than when they are performed at an outpatient hospital, but they typically offer fewer complimentary services, and may not have the full-range of support services that a hospital provides.

Outpatient facilities are outpatient departments or clinics that may be within or next to a hospital, but is owned and run by the affiliated hospital. These facilities can perform surgical treatments and procedures that do not require an overnight stay. Procedures performed at an outpatient hospital are often more expensive than when they are performed in an ambulatory surgery center, but outpatient hospitals may offer more complimentary and support services for patients because they are connected to the hospital system.

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* Savings estimate based on a study of more than 1 billion claims comparing self-pay (or cash pay) prices of a frequency-weighted market basket of procedures to insurer-negotiated rates for the same. Claims were collected between July 2017 and July 2019. R.Lawrence Van Horn, Arthur Laffer, Robert L.Metcalf. 2019. The Transformative Potential for Price Transparency in Healthcare: Benefits for Consumers and Providers. Health Management Policy and Innovation, Volume 4, Issue 3.

Sidecar Health offers and administers a variety of plans including ACA compliant and excepted benefit plans. Coverage and plan options may vary or may not be available in all states.

Your actual costs may be higher or lower than these cost estimates. Check with your provider and health plan details to confirm the costs that you may be charged for a service or procedure.You are responsible for costs that are not covered and for getting any pre-authorizations or referrals required by your health plan. Neither payments nor benefits are guaranteed. Provider data, including price data, provided in part by Turquoise Health.

The site is not a substitute for medical or healthcare advice and does not serve as a recommendation for a particular provider or type of medical or healthcare.